SoMo

With muli-platinum singles, over one billion total streams, and a Gold album under his belt as an artist, SoMo has come a long way from his early days releasing songs & videos from his bedroom in North Texas. An artist with his roots planted firmly in the Pop R&B world, his writing conveys a wide-range of influences, from Country to Alternative to Hip Hop. Also working recently in more outside artist focused sessions, he co-wrote the track ‘Different’ from Maggie Lindemann’s 2021 EP, Zhavia Ward’s lead single on her ’17 EP’, entitled ‘Candlelight’ and the single ‘Typa Luv’ with Daniel Munoz (Epic). A country version of his biggest song, Ride, was released by Chase Rice, and is also certified platinum.

FRANKIE and the WITCH FINGERS

If you tune your ears to the cracks in the San Andreas and listen in for the world gurgling grind, you might come close to the tectonic thunder that’s been beaming out of L.A. for the past few years under the banner of Frankie and the Witch Fingers. Hashed and hardened in the Midwest Indy enclave of Bloomington and catching the ear of the Chicago psych contingent with their early singles, the band headed West around the same time that the crew at Permanent put up shop in the Golden State. With records spread across labels like Hypnotic Bridge, Permanent, Greenway, and The Reverberation Appreciation Society, the band has been an ever-evolving force of rhythm-ripped rock ‘n roll pummel ever since. Anchored by songwriters Dylan Sizemore and Josh Menashe, the band has kept a rotating door of friends and collaborators moving through their midst along the way, with each bringing their own particular melt to the mountain of sound the Witch Fingers maintain. Following the ambitious Monsters Eating People Eating Monsters… the band burrowed further into the street tar grip and pelvic pulse of L.A. rock ‘n roll euphoria with an oil-slick drop-kick of a single — “Cookin’ b/w Tracksuit.” The release accompanied a 5-week U.S. tour that saw the band topping bills at NY’s Bowery Ballroom and gracing the lineups of Levitation in Austin and Shaky Knees Fest in Atlanta. Their time at Levitation also saw the band enter the fest’s revered Sessions series, recording a live LP that culled from the MEPEM and ZAM records heavily. The session found the band holed up for a week at Super X Ranch outside of Joshua Tree, California, finally pressing their stage heat onto a twelve-inch tempest for posterity. The last run oiled the gears for what’s to come, getting them back into their natural habitat up on the stage, steaming under the hot lights and sublimating a heady mix of psych-soul singe into a full-body buzz. The upcoming year promises a renewed dedication to tour, molding their mayhem in the process into its final form before they enter the studio to scrape the scars off of the road to tape. In anticipation, a new face enters the fray for both the live arena and the gestating new LP. Drummer Nick Aguilar will join now-permanent bassist Nikki Pickle (Death Valley Girls) as the rhythm engine behind the acetylene alchemy of Dylan and Josh. Nick brings a new crunch to the kit, having honed his craft in the San Pedro / LBC punk scene before touring as the drummer for Mike Watt. The addition of Nick turns up the tumult, both on stage and in the studio, and his prolific pound will act as a powerful catalyst for the band’s next direction. The new lineup finds the band as potent as ever, and following past stints opening for luminaries like OSEES, Cheap Trick, and ZZ Top, the Witch Fingers have more than proven their heft, now entering a new chapter as heirs of the amp stack kingdom. While the last record, and an ensuing storm of dates made Frankie and the Witch Fingers a household handle — burning through a barrage of multicolored vinyl pressings and sparring with indie heavyweights for Billboard chart positions — the band returns from the forge of 2020 and the vice of 2021 to make a case for the rapture of the stage once again. Bringing an audience back to the wellspring to connect to these songs on a metaphysical level, the band transforms the stage into a sonic scrub for the soul. With years spent pressure-coating their sound into a diamond-hard hydra of heaviness, the band enters its next phase hungry for the heat of the throng and ready to wrap the Witch Fingers’ grip tighter around the reigns of rock ’n roll.

THE GODDAMNED GALLOWS & REBELMATIC

Band BioIn 2004 The Goddamn Gallows began their rough and tumble voyageand haven’t looked in the review mirror since. Leaving six studioalbums in their path, they have been reinventing their music withevery record. Spit from the heart of America’s Rust Belt, arising from anight of flophouse violence. Drifting across the states, they cementedtheir sound in Portland, OR and later in Los Angeles, CA, where theylived in abandoned buildings, squatter camps, storage units andshoebox apartments. In 2007, they left everything behind and spentthe next four years living out of whatever vehicle would get them tothe next town. Building upon their original sound of twanged-out,punk rock “gutterbilly” (Life of Sin 2004 and Gutterbillyblues 2007),they began picking up stray musicians along the way and adding totheir sound; washboard, accordion, mandolin and banjo (Ghost of th’Rails 2009 and 7 Devils 2011) creating a sound referred to as”hobocore”, “gypsy-punk” or “americana-punk”, while never beingstuck in any one sound. Enter 2018 and The Goddamn Gallows havereinvented themselves once again with The Trial. From rockabilly,psychobilly and punk rock, to bluegrass and metal, The Trial infusesdisparate sounds into a new strange recipe of seamless genre bendingprofundities. Chock full of impromptu antics of the shocking varietyand hauntingly eclectic instrumentation, The Goddamn Gallows havemade legions of fans with their legendary, live shows. The GoddamnGallows, takes their progression of mixing punk rock, bluegrass,psychobilly, and metal to a whole new level! The Goddamn Gallowshave now partnered with Sailor’s Grave Records to help deliver thenext chapter of their legacy to the world. The Trial begins now.

VISION VIDEO

As an active paramedic, firefighter, and veteran of the war in Afghanistan, Vision Video lead Dusty Gannon has seen more horror in real life than in the classic movies he draws inspiration from. When not saving lives on the front-line, Dusty dons torn fishnets, combat boots and makeup to play post-punk that recalls the genre’s heyday when the lines between goth and pop blurred to create some of the underground’s most beloved acts such as The Cure, The Smiths and Joy Division. But hidden within Vision Video’s catchy hooks and dancy beats is a nostalgic yet desperate message exploring the darker undertones of our existence. At its core, Inked In Red looks inward to understand the effects of war and the global pandemic. Dusty’s experiences in service have imparted an authentic gravitas to the music, revealing a cautionary tale of unhinged mental illness born of trauma. Sonically, this is reflected in every chord and melody through its enticingly gothic yet often upbeat nature. Vision Video’s debut imparts a duality of mania that, simply stated, is real malaise and existential dread that cannot be made facsimile.

BENT KNEE

BENT KNEE – FROSTING BIO   Bent Knee are not a band for convention. In fact, since forming in 2009, the Boston-based six-piece have been on a constant journey of musical exploration that thoroughly disregards it. The result is five records that completely defy categorization and transcend genre. In other words, the band don’t just break the rules, they make up their own. That’s ensured they exist exclusively on their own terms. Frosting, the band’s sixth full-length, pushes those boundaries even further. It’s the most Bent Knee-esque Bent Knee record to date, which means that, simultaneously, it’s also the album of theirs that sounds the least like Bent Knee. That’s perhaps a journey the band – Courtney Swain (lead vocals/keyboards), Ben Levin (lead guitar/backing vocals), Jessica Kion (bass/backing vocals), Gavin Wallace-Ailsworth (drums), Chris Baum (violin/backing vocals) and Vince Welch (synthesizers/guitar) – would have taken anyway, but the extent to which it’s true was amplified by circumstance. While no-one needs reminding about the havoc wreaked by the coronavirus pandemic, it did mean that Bent Knee weren’t able to approach the making of this record in the same way as the previous five. In fact, this one was written entirely remotely. “This was definitely very different,” admits Welch, who – like all previous Bent Knee albums – was also behind the sound design and production of this one. “Every other album had basically been the band in a room at at least some point in the process, but we finished this one still having never played these songs together. And then the technological limitation of having to send each other everything created this different dynamic that slowed everything down. You didn’t have to react to an idea in like half a second – you could take an afternoon to ponder it.” “It was really interesting writing-wise,” adds Kion, “because it became a lot less about how quickly each person could get their idea out. And the ideas also didn’t have to be fully formed to exist. We each had these little seedling ideas that were all up for grabs – just writing these tiny little pieces and just sharing them and working with whatever felt good. And that made such a different album.” That approach meant that, even after a decade writing songs together, the band were still learning new things about the way they worked together. Taking those seedlings – which, for example, might be just two bars – that were up for grabs, the six of them worked communally from afar to build these songs from the ground up. Whether it was by mashing two of those seedlings together or writing a verse over one of them, everybody in the band chipped in the ways they saw fit to get the most out of those initial ideas.  

MATMOS

Performing and diffusing material from their albums Plastic Anniversary, The Consuming Flame and Regards Boguslaw Schaeffer.